Best and Worst Dog Breeds for Apartment Living

Worst and best dogs breed for apartment life
My home is my fortress

Hello! I’m not making big news saying that, the majority of people live in big cities, in different apartments. Being constantly stuck within four walls, whether it is some nameless office or your apartment, people crave human communication and sometimes get pets. Dogs are the target pet of this short article.

If you want to get a dog that will brighten up your day and your apartment, you should approach the question of choice with all seriousness. Picking the best dog that will fit in your apartment perfectly is not easy. Luckily for you, my readers, I made some research on the issue and I’m about to present you my list of dogs.

Huge outdoor breed
Hallo!

Worst Dog Breeds for Apartment

I don’t mean that the following breeds are not likely to survive the possible claustrophobia of living in a limited space. I mean that the dog will be feeling uncomfortable and thus, will ruin your usual lifestyle. Here’s the list of the dogs that I found on the Net  to be worst for living apartment:

  • Hounds in general. Hounds are quick and alerting in nature. They were created for hunting and therefore, for big open spaces. This is why greyhounds, wolfhounds, borzois, whippets, foxhounds – to be honest, all hounds cannot tolerate “captivity” within the apartment. When being kept inside, hounds, especially the English and American hounds tend to be destructive and irritated constantly.
  • Terriers in general. Another group of dogs that is not suitable for living in an apartment. Terriers are also high in energy, too intelligent to be…incarcerated. Pit Bulls and Staffords stand apart as they are the worst apartment dwellers that you may think of. However, they make perfect family companions…
  • Herding dogs like Border collie, Old English sheepdog, Australian and German shepherds show outstanding work ethic and this is why they feel completely out of the game, if kept inside. To be honest, they are extreme neurotics when it comes to secluded areas.
  • Dogs friends
    Mom’s coming, but home’s still dirty. Oh, God, save us.

    Sled dogs. Those chaps that pull sleds – I mean malamutes, huskies, samoyeds and Eskimo spitz normally don’t do well in apartments (see also Husky puppies). These naturally born leaders need constant exercising and unless your apartment is just a sleepover place, there is no point in torturing the poor runner soul. Seriously, how would you feel, knowing that you can perform as best marathon runners do in the Olympics but, have to stay put?

  • Mastiffs. Bull, Spanish and Tibetan mastiffs are not suitable either. Urban lifestyle doesn’t suit any giant.
  • Dalmatians. Only few Dalmatians can adapt to the apartment environment. The spotted beauty when confined, behaves like a bull stuck in a China shop (see also akc.org/dog-breeds/dalmatian/).
  • Poodles. Any dog having gundog roots needs to run, chase and catch. Poodles are not an exception, commonly; they are all maladapted to apartment (read akc.org/dog-breeds/poodle/detail/).

I think this list is not complete. I’m pretty sure there are dozens of other breeds that won’t fit into apartment. If you’ve got some names to mention – please, do so in the comment section!

Kid and pet
Look at this guy, he’s ..

Best Dog Breeds for Apartment

I won’t tell for sure the whole list of the most suitable dog breeds – it comprises dozens of breeds. I made sort of a hit list of breeds that dog fanciers/apartment dwellers favors. Feel free to contribute to this list in the comment section below!

Here is my list:

  • Basenji. This dog barks on rare occasions and it’s the great choice for those who live in an apartment with cardboard-thin walls (see Thekennelclub.org.uk).
  • Bichon Frise. A dog barely rising one foot tall will feel even the studio as a big open space. In addition, Bichon shed less and are not as allergenic as other breeds (more about Marystevenson.articlealley.com/bichon-frise).
  • Boston Terrier. Before, I mentioned that the majority of terriers are not suitable for apartment. This one is exclusion, because it is small in size and an affectionate pet.
  • Brussels Griffon. Nope, it’s not a mythical beast but, a real discovery. Sturdy, lively, small… Great companion that looks like a living toy (see Brusselsgriffonrescue.org).
  • Bulldog. They are small, lazy and fit well into all types of armchairs, sofas and beds. I mean it! Moreover, one to two short walks a day is all they need (read more Bulldog puppies).
  • Little apartment dog
    Too cute

    Chihuahua. Who can be smaller? This is why Chis make great apartment dogs. Actually, apartment is their natural habitat (also see Eurobreeder.com).

  • Chinese Crested. Fabulous look and fabulous desire to luxuriate on leather sofa rather than walking countless miles outdoors. Who says laziness is not a virtue? (read Chinesecrested.no).
  • Coton De Tulear. Nobility? Maybe. Whatever you may think, this dog is not some Louis XIV-style deadhead. It is an energizing dog that like walks, plays fetch and fits into any apartment. However, let it be out at least once a day (more about Americancotonclub.com).
  • Dachshund. This smallest version of hound dogs can live anywhere – no matter the size of premises. It’s truly a universal dog (see Akc.org/dog-breeds/dachshund/).
  • Maltese. Having a history of good companionship worth 2,000 years means, you can trust this dog. This dog, though, suffers from separation anxiety. So no matter where you live, just make sure someone is constantly around (read more http://www.americanmaltese.org).
  • Miniature Pinscher. Looking like the ultimate small version of Doberman, this miniature is as confident as the bigger version. This dog needs to be introduced to children as early as possible. But if you live on your own and have no children, this dog is the one you’re looking for(more about Animalplanet.com/breed-selector).
  • Pekinese. This dog once accompanied Chinese royal court and now is one of the most recognizable breeds in the world. This dog needs training; otherwise its barking may drive you nuts. All Pekinese thrive, when it’s the only dog on campus (see also Oakhillpekingese.com).

You know what? I could continue this list and write more names. I guess you must have already understood the pattern: the size is decisive.

A small dog needs less food, less space for feeling comfortable and hence makes a great cohabitant.

Hope you found this short article helpful, folks! If there is anything I should know too, feel free to write it down there – in comments. Me, being a dog fancier too, I’ll be pleased to read some helpful info on this matter.

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